Oral history workshop

Fig 10: This is the view from the station footbridge as I returned with my camera on 30th March 1968 at Kirkby-in-Ashfield. Photo Credit: Malcolm Rush

Youthful Days – Part 11b

So it was on Saturday 30th March 1968 when riding my push-bike to the Co-op to start my deliveries, I spotted something amiss on the railway track near to the site of Kirkby station. Diesel locomotive No. D8163 had run away and derailed on the trap points protecting the exit onto the main line.

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Fig 11: English Electric Type 1 Bo-Bo No. No. D8163 after coming to grief on 30th March 1968 at Kirkby-in-Ashfield. Photo Credit: Malcolm Rush

I continued my journey to the Co-op where I told my boss, Brian, what I had seen and that I’d start my round a bit late – I wanted to go home and fetch my camera. This I did and below are some of the shots I took that day. Fortunately, the crew were able to escape by leaping from the engine.

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Fig 12: Another view of No. D8163 on 30th March 1968 at Kirkby-in-Ashfield. Lima produced a model of this loco in OO gauge. The full-size version had mixed fortunes because, after this incident, D8163 sustained a “hefty whack” to its cab. I’ve seen a photo on flickr of it in a damaged state at Crewe Works on 19th September 1968. A comment says it occurred at Tibshelf Sidings. Notwithstanding the 2 accidents D8163, later 20163, survived until 25th September 1992. Photo Credit: Malcolm Rush

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Fig 13: No. D8163, looking towards the station and the level crossing. Later in the day I took more photos by which time the precarious position of the loco leaning against the concrete lamp post had been supported by wooden sleepers. Photo Credit: Malcolm Rush

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Fig 14: At 1.00pm, after I had finished delivering the Co-op meat, I returned to see what recovery progress had been made and to take some more photos. Some wagons had been removed and D8163 had been supported by wooden sleepers. In the background you can see the former station building along with signals and the footbridge. Photo Credit: Malcolm Rush

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Fig 15: Fifty-two years later, after posting this photo on Facebook, I found out from Rob Bradford that he was on the photo. Rob sadly passed away in 2022. He was a keen supporter of the SB2K Facebook pages and a tribute to him can be seen via this link https://kirkbysteam.co.uk/last-visit-to-kirkby-loco-tribute-to-rob-bradford/  In 2020 Rob commented on my Facebook post –  “I can just be discerned standing beneath the l / h telegraph post, wearing my blue windcheater.” Reading Rob’s tribute it can be seen that D8163 was one of the locos at Kirkby shed on his last visit, 31st October 1970. Photo Credit: Malcolm Rush

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Fig 16: Extract from the Notts Free Press, Friday 5th April 1968 edition, describing the incident. Unfortunately, the reporter used the wrong terminology for the safety points. They were, in fact, “trap points” – used to protect main railway lines from unauthorised vehicles moving onto them from sidings. “Catch-points” are used to derail vehicles out of control on falling gradients. Photo Credit: Malcolm Rush

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Fig 17: Graham Upchurch’s OO gauge diorama of the 1968 EE Type 1 D8163 Kirkby derailment at the 2022 Elizabethan Model Railway Society event. Photo Credit – David Amos

An example of catch-points at Kirkby-in-Ashfield could be seen on the ex-Great Central line as it emerged from Annesley tunnel on the 1 in 132 climb towards Kirkby South Junction. During my spotting years on Lindley’s Lane bridge I never saw any wagons derailed by those catch-points. I later learned that special “Is Line Clear” bell signals were used between Annesley North Junction and Kirkby South Junction boxes for freight trains to advise the Kirkby South signalman if a long train was being offered which should not be held at the home signals.

Another benefit of my delivery round was the discovery that one of my Co-op customers was a driver at Kirkby shed. By this time diesels had taken over and Len Warren had converted to driving them. When he found out that I had an interest in railways he offered to take me on a couple of his workings. Casting aside my preference for steam, I eagerly snatched his hand off at this offer and I twice experienced cab rides in a Brush Type 4 diesel.

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Fig 18: Driver Len Warren sitting at the controls of his Brush Type 4 in August 1967.  Photo Credit: Malcolm Rush

The first day out began when Len stopped his engine and brake van at the site of Kirkby-in-Ashfield (East) station to pick me up. We then travelled to Newstead colliery to pick up our train of loaded coal wagons before heading off to Staythorpe Power Station, via Nottingham. On the other occasion I can’t recall the specific Power Station we went to but I think it may have been Willington, Derbys. I do, though, remember that on our return to Kirkby we travelled via Pye Bridge and then backed the empty train into Bentinck Colliery via the connection from Bentinck Colliery Sidings signalbox. With hindsight I wish I’d noted down details of the journeys and, perhaps, took some more photos.

Finally, to end this blog, I show below some of my favourite Kodak Brownie 127 photos which I took at Kirkby-in-Ashfield. The ones of the locos waiting to be scrapped aren’t, though, my favourite images. However, they were what I saw and my memories have been perpetuated through my Brownie 127.

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Fig 19: BR Standard 9F 2-10-0 stands in the front yard at Kirkby shed in 1964. You can see Low Moor Road houses in the left background. Although I didn’t note which engine it was, I’m pretty sure it was 92008. That was a Kirkby allocated engine from 02/05/1964 to 19/11/1964 and, from new until 05/09/1964 it was fitted with the BR1G tender type seen here, 7 ton coal and 5000 gallon water capacity. It then swopped tenders with 92095 at Annesley, acquiring a BR1F 7 ton, 5700 gallon flat-sided version. Put to service 31/03/54 at 15A Wellingborough, it was condemned 05/10/1967 from 8B Warrington Dallam, stored at 8C Speke Junction 10/67 to 06/68, cut up at Buttigiegs, Newport 08/68. Service Life 13 years 6 months 6 days. Photo Credit:  Malcolm Rush. Colourised version

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Fig 20: 4F 0-6-0 locos at Kirkby shed waiting for the call to the scrapyard in 1964. Photo Credit:  Malcolm Rush. Colourised version

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Fig 21: Black 5 4-6-0 No. 44962 stands at Kirkby shed in 1964 (The later built shed building is on the right). A 16C Derby allocated engine from 23/04/1963 to 12/09/1964 then a 16F Burton engine. Put to service 15/06/1946 at 17A Derby. Withdrawn from 9D Newton Heath 30/12/1967. Scrapped during 03/1968. Service life 21 years 6 months 15 days. Photo Credit:  Malcolm Rush. Colourised version

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Fig 22: Stanier 8F 2-8-0 No. 48775 eases its train out of the sidings and approaches Kirkby station on 21st August 1964. A loco in the sidings depicted in Fig 21 can be seen between the telegraph pole and the left building. At the time of preparing this blog both the left building and the “Edge Bros” one are still standing on Portland Street, Kirkby-in-Ashfield. In August 1964 48775 was a 9D Newton Heath allocated engine. Put to service 04/1937. Withdrawn from 10D Lostock Hall 03/08/1968. Scrapped during 12/1968. Service life 31 years 4 months 3 days. Photo Credit:  Malcolm Rush. Colourised version

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Fig 23: Johnson 1F 0-6-0T No. 41712 stands at Kirkby shed on 26th September 1964. A 16B Kirkby-in-Ashfield allocated engine from 09/04/1960, she had previously been allocated to Mansfield shed. Put to service during 05/1882. Withdrawn from 16B Kirkby-in-Ashfield 19/09/1964. Scrapped during 12/1964 at Cohens (Kettering). Service life 82 years 5 months. Photo Credit:  Malcolm Rush. Colourised version

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Fig 24: 4F 0-6-0 No. 44248 as seen from the footplate of 41712 at Kirkby shed on 26th September 1964. A 16E Kirkby-in-Ashfield allocated engine from 27/06/1964. Put to service during 05/1926. Withdrawn from 16E Kirkby-in-Ashfield 26/09/1964. Scrapped during 03/1965 at Cohens (Ikles, near Rotherham). Service life 38 years 4 months 27 days. Photo Credit:  Malcolm Rush. Colourised version

References:

BR Database:- https://www.brdatabase.info/

Notts Free Press

 

Blog by Malcolm Rush

Posted by SB2K Admin – 28th January 2024